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Posts Tagged ‘jason hartong’

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Visit Hartong International for antiques, fine art and vintage items.  We sell unique handpicked items from both North America & Europe.  Every item we sell has been cleaned, preserved or carefully refurbished to retain originality.  We put an exceptional effort into offering items, which have been handled with a great deal of care.  At Hartong International, we have a passion for antiques, fine art & vintage items, so we only offer the best in service and go to great lengths in making sure you receive exactly what you see offered on our site.  Our attention to handling makes for a stress free shipping experience.  

We originally started our business in Kenilworth, Illinois.  In the spring of 2011, we moved the business to Massachusetts.  Indeed a wise move, as we have greater access to older antique furnishings, lovely original art and very interesting vintage items.  Along with the move, we expanded our business by acquiring a larger studio space, with more room for creating a complete collection.  We now have greater access to receiving shipments from Europe and all of New England to hunt for the items which our clients and customers desire.  

For a wider selection of our inventory, please visit our Etsy shop.  We put most of our smaller items on Etsy.  You will find many more vintage items within this shop.  

Coming soon to Hartong International, we will be partnered with Second Shout Out.  SSO is a New York City based site, dedicated to offering a vintage lifestyle, with anything from classic 1950s European cars to unique antique furnishings and vintage technology.  Please check the site often for updates.  It’s an exciting way to offer the best in taste and aesthetics from the past for modern living.

We sincerely look forward to serving you!

Please feel free to contact us, with any questions you may have.  If you happen to have a specific antique or vintage item you must have, but don’t see it on our site, email us with details. We frequent a lot of estate sales and have priceless contacts to other dealers in the USA and throughout Europe, so it’s likely we can find what you are looking for, if we don’t have it.  Our inventory is also much larger than what we have listed.  It’s taking us time to catalog and list every item.  Check our site often, as new acquisitions are listed every couple of weeks.

Email: inquire@hartonginternational.com, Tel. 847 630 3102, Site: www.hartonginternational.com

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There are many fantastic beaches along the Chicago North Shore and well into the city. The city beaches can all be visited free of charge, with North Avenue beach being the most popular.  I’m not sure of the total count, but there are beaches from Rogers Park to the South Side.

Evanston has six beaches with one being a dog beach. A beach token must be purchased to avoid the $8 charge per visit to enter onto an Evanston beach. I favor Lee Street beach in Evanston for no significant reason, but it’s definitely an attractive place to relax in the sun.

Wilmette has a fantastic beach at Gilson Park, but I’m not sure of the current cost. Winnetka, Highland Park and Lake Forest have a few notable beaches.  I’d recommend clicking on the town and city links I have on the side bar for more information about the lakeshore offerings in the various municipalities. There’s a lot to choose from along Lake Michigan’s shores, so have fun and explore a bit.

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Visiting Sissinghurst in England’s Southeast is a step back into several layers of history. The ruins of an Elizabethan summer palace were purchased by the eccentric couple, Vita Sacksville-West and Harold Nicolson. Both having been writers, they rebuilt the remnants of a centuries old pile in their own vision of a romantic past. The gardens were built in the 1930s around architectural remnants consisting of stonewalls, foundations and old terraces. It was a work in progress during their lifetime together. The Bohemian paradise even had a working farm attached to the property, but has long since vanished. Under the supervision of the National Trust, the gardens and home have been polished to facilitate the masses that visit every year.  It’s a euphoric experience to spend the day there, wandering around the various outdoor spaces they planned and implemented.

Mr. Nicolson and his family currently live on the property as part of an agreement in the will of his predecessors, but the grounds are owned and managed by The National Trust.  The current family and The National Trust have somewhat of an interesting relationship.

A few years ago, the BBC aired a series on the daily relationship between Sissinghursts permanent ancestoral residents and the management.  It was fairly entertaining and gave a good look into the operations of a highly toured English historical site.  I’m sure it will broadcast here in the States on PBC in the near future.

The New York Times recently posted an article written by Adam Nicolson.  Adam is an expert author on the history of the property and the lives of his grandparents.

To read more about Sissinghurst and its facinating history, click here.

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This is a project that was designed a couple of years ago.  I’m amazed at how far along the plantings have filled in during year two.  I’m currently working on several similar types of homes in Chicago and several on the North Shore.  It’s been a busy landscape design season, but here are some examples of the type of projects I’ve taken on this year.

If you would like a beautiful landscape designed and planted this summer, contact Watercolour Gardens at 1.847.380.2699 or visit our website for more details.

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As a landscape designer, I often take scent into consideration in planning a garden. When designing scented cues, the emotional response to the visual stimuli is enhanced. Scent can make the experience more meaningful and memorable for the garden’s owner and guests, when used properly.

Scent is a very powerful tool. It serves as a means of communication in so many ways. An attraction between individuals. A memory. A way to manipulate consumers, as stores pump Oxytocin into ventilation systems to increase spending. Scent is not something we think about all the time but our subconscious minds are always aware of it.

The New York Times recently covered a symposium on scent as design.  It’s interesting to see what the scent experts are up to.

A Parsons Symposium on Scent as Design

By JOYCE WADLER                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Photo: Robert Wright for The New York Times
WE arrived late for “Headspace: On Scent as Design,” a symposium held March 26 in the auditorium at Parsons the New School for Design, and so missed the smell of birth being spritzed into the room.

Happily, we had another opportunity, because that scent, along with several others — including “being a baby,” “puberty,” “partnership,” “empty nest,” “sex” and “death” — were available for inhalation at a table outside the auditorium, most of them embedded in small plastic beads that visitors were invited to take.

“No one likes puberty,” Kim Fisher, the young woman at the table, said. “Everyone likes sex, but there are no beads for it.”

Being not quite product-ready is not uncommon when things are brainy and theoretical, and at Headspace — a conference presented by Parsons and the Museum of Modern Art, in partnership with International Flavors and Fragrances Inc., Coty and Seed magazine — they were extremely cerebral. Does your head ache after that list of sponsors? Imagine how you would have felt in the auditorium, where designers, perfumers and industry experts talked about “co-creation” and “facilitating dialogue with the consumer.”

“I see design going through filtering, clarifying, making things visible — how does that go towards defining your work as a designer?” a moderator asked in a morning session, making us ache for the scent “coffee.” Also, the auditorium was freezing.

Why is it so cold? we asked Jamer Hunt, the director of the new graduate program in transdisciplinary design at Parsons and one of the people who dreamed up the symposium, after we beat it to the outside foyer.

“There’s a special technology for diffusing,” Mr. Hunt said. “We need the back doors of the auditorium to be open so the scent flows through to everybody.”

For Headspace, Mr. Hunt explained, designers and architects like Toshiko Mori had been paired with perfumers to “design using scent — not just a fragrance, but something that would affect our everyday lives.”

Ms. Mori had been involved in creating a scent called “anti-gravity.” Marije Vogelzang, a Dutch designer, had made eating utensils imbued with the smells of foods that might be harmful to consume but are still nice to sniff. The urban designer Majora Carter had worked on scents that could be diffused through the ventilation system of an apartment complex in her neighborhood in the South Bronx.

Mr. Hunt also seemed proud of a student project called “Scent Clock,” a piece of cardboard listing six times of day. “If you scratch at each hour, there is a different smell associated with a different time of day,” he said. “Scratch the shiny spot.”

The reporter scratched an orange rectangle labeled “10 wake up” and smelled not much of anything.

“We wanted to make it a challenge and didn’t want it to be easy,” Mr. Hunt said. “It’s a combination of toothpaste and an alarm clock.”

The reporter inhaled again, smelling mint. That explained the toothpaste, but where was the alarm clock?

“There should be a slightly more plastic smell to it,” Mr. Hunt said. “Part of the challenge is what does an alarm clock smell like? I think it smells like electronics, which is a certain kind of burning smell, but there is also the metaphysical. An alarm clock wakes you up, so you want a smell that is very bright.”

The reporter moved on to the scent made by Ayse Birsel, who has designed pots and pans for Target and toilet seats for Toto. Ms. Birsel and her colleague Yoko Hiroshi, working with perfumers Celine Barel and Laurent Le Guernec, created a birth through death line. As Ms. Birsel conceived it, each scent would be contained in a large, smooth stone that would symbolize that moment in life. Since there was no time to imbue the stones with the scent, they were presented separately.

Ms. Birsel, who wore a black stone-like Japanese gourd around her neck and black fishnet stockings, had a half-dozen stones with her.

“What we wanted to do was give form and scent to threshold in life,” she said. “We wanted to create a very intimate form. The form of the pebble as something you can hold in your hand would symbolize a moment in your life, like a birth or a partnership.”

So those two halves of a stone that fit smoothly together — is that one “partnership”?

“This is sex, actually, the pebble as yin and yang, two perfect pieces that come together,” Ms. Birsel said. “Partnership is the whole stone. We decided puberty is about dichotomy, you have multiple personalities and a piece missing because you are not totally whole.”

What about the scent?

“We asked them to create a scent that is unbalanced, with too many hormones,” Ms. Birsel said. “We had them imbued in the little plastic pearls, because in the time frame we had we couldn’t inject them in the forms.”

We heard nobody likes the puberty scent, we told her.

“Well, nobody likes puberty, so it’s a successful smell,” she said. “That was the intention.”

Click for the original article.


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Planted containers and decorative urns add scale and visual points of interest to a landscape. Some gardens confined to tight boundaries, might consist of only container plants. The plants residing inside a container can be upright, structural or soft and colourful.  It’s just a matter of setting and how much visual attention you want them to attract.

Recently, cubed planters in a range of materials, from zinc to polished concrete have grown in popularity. So have monochromatic textural plants. Shades of green foliage and shrubbery have become a dominant trend in upscale container planting.

Many garden trends start with London’s annual Chelsea Flower Show.  Zinc containers  became big with Chelsea show gardens about five years ago. As a result, they have become a standard for contemporary container flare.  Zinc works well in both contemporary and many traditional landscape settings. Although design trends come and go, metal is here to stay.

SimplyPlanters

Terrace Gardener

For container garden design, visit Watercolour Gardens.

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Now that the ground has thawed, it’s a great time to start planting shrubs & trees. The roots tend to take well in the cool wet conditions. Spring is a short season in Chicago, so the sooner the better. Less water is required than in summer planting, in turn costing a homeowner less to start a new landscape.

Regardless of when anything is planted, mulch is essential. Mulch helps to retain moisture in the soil and discourages weeds from growing. Make sure to use a natural dark mulch like, shredded hardwood.  It looks great and improves the soil as it breaks down.  For more about landscaping ideas, visit Watercolour Gardens.

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